Pre-K: April 2018/2019

Welcome to April!

Poetry:  Focus on the KMPs for long/a/ in the monthly poem, “It is April.” Pick up /r/, /h/, /p/, and /w/ as you sing. Model the final /s/ in days and puddles. Expose to /ing/ in holding and/ ĭ/, in it and is.

KMPs: Develop /r/, /ou/, /y/, and /g/. Keep reviewing the other KMPs we’ve done, especially the consonants. Layer them into the poems over time.

R & W Monster: Attach the language story to the first stroke. Play with the R&W M. Whiteboards without lines give the young child space to perfect the stroking and become more fluid and fluent.

Language Calendar: Illustrate each entry and call attention to the details in the picture. The focus on flowers, bulbs, and insects featured in books by the children’s author, Lois Ehlert.

Have a great month!

Dr. Terry Kindervater, Ph.D.
Educator & Founder of Phonics in Motion

KMPs

Monthly poem - start simple and add additional KMPs as the month progresses!

April

(To the tune of Frere Jacques)

It is April.
It is April.
Rainy days.
Rainy days.
Holding my umbrella.
Walking through the puddles.
Splish, splash, splish.
Splish, splash, splish.

Poem by Phonics in Motion team

Introduce

/r/

Review

/s/

Expose

/ing/, /ā/, / ĭ/

Simple Poem Demonstration Video Advanced Poem Demonstration Video

Weekly Poem

Spring

 

Tulips yellow
Tulips red
Standing tall
In the garden bed!

Poem by unknown author

Introduce

/g/

Review

/t/, /b/, /r/, /y/

Expose

/ĭ/

Weekly Poem

Rainbow Month

 

April is a rainbow month,
Of sudden springtime showers.
Bright with golden daffodils,
And lots of pretty flowers.

Poem by unknown author

Introduce

/ou/

Review

/r/, /s/, /sh/, /g/

Expose

/ā/

Weekly Poem

Daffodils

 

Yellow, yellow daffodils
You’re dancing in the sun.
Yellow, yellow daffodils
You tell me Spring has come!

Poem by unknown author

Introduce

/y/

Review

/d/ /s/

Expose

/ing/

Reading & Writing Monster: Handwriting Stories

Rr

r is right on.

r goes down and up

and away from the Monster.

Yy

y is yuk, yuk, yuk!

y moves away from the Monster,

and yuck, yuck, yuck!

(Emphasize yuk as line continues diagonally toward the Monster.)

Gg

g is good gone goofy!

g goes to the Monster,

comes away, goes down,

and right to the Monster!

Good gone goofy!

Ss

s is so so silly.

s goes to the Monster,

comes away,

and, goes right back again.

So so silly.

A short note...

Many of our Language Calendar entries this month will focus on our author study of Lois Ehlert.

The LC is a great routine for developing necessary vocabulary and language concepts. A simple sentence, (We jumped.) is a great way to ask Who and What did we do questions. Add What, When, and Where questions. Illustrate to call attention to details.

Choose 1 day of the week to write each sentence in a different color.  Then focus on the number of words in the first sentence and the second sentence.  Which one is longer?  shorter?

Daily...

  • Illustrate each entry for picture to match text.
  • Clap a short word and a long word (two or more syllables).  Say, "That's a short word."  Say, "That's a long word."
  • Stretch out a word. Say it slowly.
  • Find the beginning sound of a word. Use KMP.
  • Draw a box around sight words (a, the, we, in, to, by, and, it, from).

Throughout The Month

  • Write entries that correlate to our Author study.
  • Tie in Social Studies or Science standards that fit the books you use. (Some flowers come from bulbs; others come from seeds.  Lois Ehlert was born in Wisconsin.)

Example of Entries

  • We talked about Lois Ehlert.  She wrote Planting a Rainbow.  Some flowers come from seeds.  Others come from bulbs.

Activities

  • Discuss Lois Ehlert.  Place 10-15 of her books in the classroom.  Discuss how they are the same (all very colorful) and different (some are about flowers or vegetables, or animals).
    Read Planting a Rainbow to the class.
  • Discuss how the author labels the different parts of the illustrations.
  • Point out the color coding.
  • Discuss bulbs versus seeds. Draw seed and a bulb in journal. Label.
  • Share some plant catalogs for students to browse through.  Discuss names of different flowers.
  • Make a class bulletin board of different flowers. Label with names.

Example for CAP Focus

  • Clap: planting, rainbow, flowers
  • KMP: /r/; /f/
  • Sight words: she, a
  • Rhyming words: come, some, from
  • Underline title of book
  • Mark /ee/.  See page 16 of the Language Calendar manual.
  • Segment and blend: seed

Example of Entries

  • We wrote the letter, r, in sand, water and shaving cream. It was fun.

Activities

  • Write the letter r in water, sand and shaving cream over the week.
  • Chant the story, “R is right on.” Finish the chant with the KMP.
  • Cut out a huge lowercase r. Paste pictures beginning with /r/ in it.
  • Journal: Print the letter in journal. Draw 3 pictures that begin with r. Label.

Example for CAP Focus

  • KMP: /r/ /l/ /s/ /w/ /f//c/
  • Do story for r as you write it.
  • Count the items in the list; how many ways did we write the letter r?
  • Clap fun. Segment and blend.
  • Sight words: and, in

Example of Entries

  • We made a flower collage.  Each of them is different. So pretty!

Activities

  • Discuss collages and what they are.  Show students Snowballs by Lois Ehlert also.
    (Lois Ehlert loves a collage.)
  • Set out various objects to make a flower ( fabric scraps, pipe cleaners, tissue paper, colored sponges, colored glass beads).  Students construct their own flowers on surface of your choice (tagboard, construction paper, wood).
  • Students write about their flowers.
  • Keep reading Lois Ehlert books!

Example for CAP Focus

  • KMP: /c/
  • Sight words: a, is, so
  • Exclamation mark
  • Count words in each sentence.  Count sentences first.  Underline each sentence in a different color.
  • Segment and blend: so

Example of Entries

  • We had an Easter egg hunt in our classroom. Some eggs were tricky to find!

Activities

  • Before students come in one day (around Easter), place plastic eggs all around the classroom. Tell students they need to work together to find all the eggs before the timer runs out; if they succeed, they will win a class prize! (Tell them how many total eggs there are).
  • After they are done searching, count the eggs together. Did we find them all? If yes, announce the prize (something simple–color an Easter picture, 10 minutes of free time, sit by a friend for the next activity, etc). If no, solve the problem together and find the missing eggs before giving the prize.
  • Make a list together of the places the eggs were hidden.
  • List:  Why was it important to work together?
  • Students draw a picture in their journal of the egg hunt. Write the name of someone who helped you during the hunt!

Example for CAP Focus

  • KMP: /ou/, /h/
  • Clap egg (short word). Do you see that word again? How is it different? (s for multiple eggs)
  • Clap tricky; how many claps? Point out short ĭ in middle.
  • Sight words: our, to

Example of Entries

  • We talked about insects.  Insects have 6 legs, antennae, and usually wings.  Butterflies, bees, and ants are all insects.

Activities

  • Watch a video about insects.  There is a good one called, “Bugs and Insects for Kindergarten and Preschool” by MakeMeGenius.
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nqxkUVfRxQY
  • Make an insect web.  Students recall facts learned about insects on to the web. Teacher records on web.
  • In journal, ask students to draw their favorite insect and label it.

Example for CAP Focus

  • Clap: antennae, butterfly, insects
  • Sight words: is, and, have
  • KMP: short ĭ; /b/, ă, /ee/
  • Comma in a series
  • -ed ending
  • Count the number of words in a sentence
  • Box ‘in’ inside insects
  • Segment and blend: bees, wings.

Example of Entries

  • We went outside to look for insects. We saw ants and a butterfly. The ants were so little.

Activities

  • Before going outside, tell students they will need to be ready to share something they noticed about insects. Take students outside and give them some time to explore. If ipads are available, take some pictures of insects that are found if possible.
  • When back inside, students each share what they noticed. Make a list as they share. Show pictures you took as they relate to conversation.
  • In journal, students draw one thing they saw and label it.

Example for CAP Focus

  • KMP: /ou/, /f/, /w/, ĭ,
  • Clap, segment, and blend look (short word).
  • Clap outside; long word. What’s another long word?
  • Which word shows more than one? How do you know? (s at the end)
  • Sight words: for, so

Example of Entries

  • We graphed our favorite books by Lois Ehlert.  Our class favorite was _______.

Activities

  • Prepare a bar graph of 3 titles of books by Lois Ehlert.  (Kids can help you choose the 3 to graph, or you can choose.)  Ask each child to color in the square next to their favorite.  Discuss results.  How many of this book?  How many of a different book?  Which book has the most?  Least?

Example for CAP Focus

  • -ed ending
  • KMP: ŏ
  • Sight words: our, we, was
  • Segment and blend: book

Monthly Tip for Engaging Parents

Welcome to April!

Read the poems that your child is working on each week of the month.  Here is one that is being used all month.

It is April
(To the tune of Frere Jacques)

It is April.
It is April.
Rainy days.
Rainy days.
Holding my umbrella.
Walking through the puddles.
Splish, splash, splish.
Splish, splash, splish.

Poem by Phonics in Motion team

Help your child to become an investigator of this poem! Here are a few example activities:

  • Circle the first and last word in a line.
  • Find words beginning or ending with a specific letter.
  • Choose a word in the poem, and break it into syllables by clapping for each syllable. Count how many syllables there are.
  • Find sight words (my, it, is,the). Use a highlighter and highlight them.
  • Put your two pointer fingers around letters and words to frame them.  Ask your child to frame a word that begins with p and ends with s (puddles).  Try framing just three letters (like spl), and framing one (it) or two words (it is).

Visit your local library and bring home books by Lois Ehlert. She writes books that have fabulous illustrations. Talk with your child about how she labels each of her pictures. Have your child draw pictures (kite, tree, cloud or someone flying a kite). Have your child listen for the sounds in the words and write them down.

Say a word, breaking it into parts. Listen for the beginning, middle, and end of the word. For example, /b/-/oo/-/k/. Ask your child what the word is (book). Can they put the sounds back together?

Have a great month!

The Phonics in Motion© team

support@phonicsinmotion.com

Downloadable Resources

Engaging Parents

Download Parent Letter

Additional Resources

PreKPIMScope&Sequence