Pre-K: August & September 2018-2019

Welcome to August & September of the 2018/2019 school year!

It’s a time of new faces, families and friends; a fun time to begin anew. It is also time to begin implementing the Phonics in Motion (PIM) method into your everyday teaching.  Below we’ll outline suggested ways to incorporate the PIM method into your classrooms.

During the first month, sing or chant the morning “Hello Song!” The children love to see and use  the Kinesthetic Motions for the Phonemes (KMPs) for the initial sound of their names and it’s a great way to learn the names of their friends.

During the first 4 to 6 weeks of school, chant or sing the songs “August” and “September,” from Chicken Soup with Rice by Maurice Sendak everyday.  Choose a KMP to do for an initial sound and add more throughout the month. Plus, starting the third week of September there will be a poem a week.

The KMPs introduced this month are /p/ and /m/.

Enjoy the fun of inserting KMPs spontaneously as you move through the day and the month. Observe how the little ones begin to associate the KMP with sounds. The goal is to immerse them in sounds and guide them to hear phonemes in natural language.

Plus, you will begin the Language Calendar at the beginning of the school year.  This routine anchors the sounds and the KMPs into written language.

Enjoy!

Terry Kindervater, Ph.D.
Educator & Founder of Phonics in Motion

KMPs

Introduce

The Hello Song

Review

None

Expose

The KMPs for the beginning sounds of children's names

Poem

Introduce

/p/

Review

None

Expose

/w/

Poem

Paw Paw Song

Picking up paw paws
Put ‘em in your pocket.
Picking up paw paws
Put ‘em in your pocket.
Picking up paw paws
Put ‘em in your pocket,
Way down yonder in the paw paw patch.

Introduce

/p/

Review

Expose

/s/

Poem

P is for purple.
P is for pink.
P is for pots
In my sink.

Introduce

/m/

Review

/p/

Expose

/w/

Poem

Miss Mary Mack

Miss Mary Mack
All dressed in black
With a big red bow
In the middle of her back.
She carried her lunch
In a purple pack
And her high-heeled shoes
Went clickety-clack.

(Many teachers sing the last word of each line multiple times.)

Introduce

/m/

Review

Expose

/b/

Poem

M is for milk.
M is for mug.
M is for markers
By the bug.

Introduce

/p/

Review

/m/

Expose

/f/

Poem

Going to School

We go to school to learn and grow
And find out things we want to know.
We read and write and count and play
And make new friends along the way!

Go to lakeshorelearning.com, resources, seasonal, bank to school poem

Reading & Writing Monster: Handwriting Stories

Pp

p is a pole that goes down fishing
Go up, up, up.
Make a pot belly
Away from the Monster

Mm

Start at the top
Move down.
M moves away
And, moves away.

A short note...

During the opening 4-6 weeks of school, introduce the Language Calendar (LC) with the Reading and Writing Monster (R&W Monster), placed on the left of the writing surface. Gather in front of the LC daily and discuss how the R&W Monster does not want us to read or write. We need to move away from the R&W Monster! Ask, “Is the R&W Monster going to win?” Guide the children to engage and respond, “No!”

Introduce the days of the week during this time. Sing (Addams Family tune) or chant, “There’s Sunday and there’s Monday…and then there’s Saturday.” Do the KMPs for the initial sounds for the days of the week. (Make sure you do the /th/ KMP for Thursday.) In this way, the teacher exposes the children to the following KMPs: /th/ /s/ /m/ /t/ /w/ /f/ during the beginning weeks of school.

As you sing the days of the week, point to the beginning letter of each day as you do the KMP for the initial sound. Encourage the children to imitate your modeling of doing the KMPs for sounds in the same way you model using gestures while singing. Say, “You do what I do.” As you move through the days of the week,  you are modeling moving away from the R&W Monster. When you finish with Saturday, demonstrate how the R&W Monster pulls you back and you need to get away again! The activity provides opportunities to use the following directional language: ‘move away’, ‘go back’, ‘move or go down,’ and ‘top to bottom.’ The fun of the R&W Monster and the use of the KMPs help make children understand how it feels to  participate as a member of a group of learners.

Once the initial experience of listening for sounds and engaging with the R&W Monster becomes a daily habit, the writing on the LC expands. Linking the KMP to the written symbol on the Calendar helps develop phonemic awareness. Add more of the KMPs in response to the children’s interest and needs. Most importantly in the beginning, make it short. Always have fun!

As you begin the Language Calendar:

During the first 2 to 4 weeks of school, draw a picture only on the Language Calendar. For example, illustrate playing outside or making a project. Sing the days of the week, doing the KMPs for initial sounds. Move away from the R&W Monster as you point to each day. The routine offers opportunities to develop language, answer specific questions and expand specific vocabulary to describe the pictures.  After the first 2-4 weeks, begin to model writing 1 sentence to match the illustration. [The routine also demonstrates left-to-right directionality for how print operates.  Point to the words when you reread entries.  Model how the print moves away from the Monster and when we reach the edge of the paper, he pulls us back to we can get away again (Return Sweep)]

The Language Calendar

Daily

  • Illustrate each entry for picture to match text.
  • First 2-4 weeks, draw a picture only from a shared experience (playing outside, using musical instruments, the cover of a book you’ve read).
  • Later, illustrate each entry to match text you’ve modeled writing.  Written text modeled; then add a matching illustration (or vice versa).
  • Clap a short word and a long word (two or more syllables).  Say, “That’s a short word.” Say, “That’s a long word.”
  • Stretch out a word. Say it slowly.
  • Read favorite literature to write about on the Calendar.
  • Write letters with handwriting story on white boards. Write without lines!
  • Find the beginning sound of a word. Use KMP.
  • Draw a box around sight words (a, the, we).

Monthly

  • Language Calendar entries should be written in past tense after a shared experience, unless it is an entry such as “Today is ____’s birthday.  She is 6.” (Or) “It is Halloween.  We had a party and wore costumes.”
  • Write entries that correlate with ELA Standards (Character, Setting).
  • Make sure there are non-fiction entries. (Plants need sun and water to grow.)
  • Revisit monthly focus (Seasons, Sink and Float, Life Cycles, or Questioning, such as Who questions.)

Examples of Entries

Activities

Examples for CAP Focus

Example of Entries

We played outside.

Activities

• Play outside. After experience, illustrate picture. Ask following questions: Who? What did we do? Where?
• Write sentence.

Examples for CAP Focus

• Draw a line for each word.
• Count the words.
• Clap: we, outside
• Where do I read?  (Point to words, not illustration.)
• Model moving away from the Reading and Writing Monster as you write (left to right)
• KMP: /p/

Example of Entries

We met the Reading and Writing Monster.

Activities

• Point out R & W Monster at left of writing surface.
• Discuss as we read and write, we need to move away from the R & W Monster.
• Journal: Give children R&W Monster for journal OR begin to show children how to draw it.  “Write a story.” Read to a friend.

Examples for CAP Focus

• Draw a line for each word.
• Picture has meaning
• Where do I read?
• Model moving away from the Reading and Writing Monster as you write
• KMP: /w/, /m/
• Period at end of sentence.
• Count the words.
•Clap: reading, writing, monster

Example of Entries

P is a pole that goes down fishing.

Activities

• Write a ‘p’ on chart. (P story directs the stroking.) Emphasize while stroking the ‘pot belly’ that you are moving AWAY from the monster.
• Children write and chant handwriting story together, writing the letter p.

Examples for CAP Focus

• KMP: /p/
• Text has meaning
• Left to right
• Count words
• Clap a long word (fishing) and a short word (pole)
• Spaces between words (Draw a line for each word before writing.)

Example of Entries

We made a polka-dot p.

Activities

• Make a large p and use pink and purple bingo markers to decorate.
• Have children decorate individual p’s.
• Use the pictures: pizza, potato, pan and zebra. Do initial KMP for /p/. Put the pictures that belong under the p. Turn zebra over.
• Ask, Did I say /s/ebra (substituting /s/ for the /z/)?
• Journal: Give children a p for their journals and 2 pictures (pan, popcorn). “Write a story.” Read to a friend.

Examples for CAP Focus

• KMP: /p/
• Count words
• Spaces between words (Draw a line for each word before writing.)
• Capital letter
• Period
• Box sight word: a

Example of Entries

We put our names in a pot.

Activities

• Write children’s names on cards of different colors. Put the children’s names in a pot. Do KMPs for the initial sounds before you put them in.
• Journal: Give each child his or her printed name to glue in journal. “Draw a picture of you. Write a story.” Share with a friend.

Examples for CAP Focus

• KMP: /w/, /p/, /n/
• Identify and name letters in name
• Picture has meaning
• Read the words
• Box sight word: a
• Underline sight word: we. Chant and spell.
• Capital and lowercase

Example of Entries

We colored macaroni.

Activities

  • Color macaroni with the children. Give each child a bag with macaroni pieces and rubbing alcohol.

Examples for CAP Focus

  • KMP: /m/
  • Count words in sentence.
  • Capital letter at beginning
  • Clap: macaroni

Example of Entries

We made milkshakes. Yummy!

Activities

  • Make milkshakes with the children.

Examples for CAP Focus

  • KMP: /m/; /w/
  • Count words
  • Clap a long word: milkshake, yummy (That’s a long word)
  • Clap a short word: made
  • Period at end
  • Exciting mark
  • Picture matches text
  • Where do we read? (Pt to text)

Monthly Tip for Engaging Parents

Read the poem daily with your child, pointing to each word.

Practice reading that sounds like talking!

Find pictures of words that begin with /m/ and /p/. Have your child show you the KMP (motion) for the beginning sound of the word.

Count the lines of the poem.
Demonstrate moving left to right on the page as you read.

KMP Videos