1st Grade: August & September 2018-2019

Welcome to August & September of the 2018/2019 school year!

August and September welcome new families, new faces and fun!

You’ll be introducing, reviewing and exposing your first graders daily to different Kinesthetic Motion for the Phoneme (KMPs) by incorporating songs and poems. Start by singing “August” and “September” from Chicken Soup with Rice by Maurice Sendak, while using KMPs for some of the initial sounds. Plus, there is a new poem each week.

As you move through the month, revisit the songs and poems to add more KMPs when appropriate. During August and September we will be reviewing consonant sounds and introducing the following KMPs: /h/ /a/ /i/ /ch/ /l/ /u/ /ee/ /g/. As they do the KMPs, make sure they are hearing the sounds in authentic language.

You’ll introduce the Language Calendar this month. The routine offers the format to introduce the Reading & Writing Monster (R&W Monster) as you model writing and directionality. Capture the opportunity to use a few KMPs for initial and final sounds as you record shared experiences daily.

It is important to note that the calendar allows the highlighting of phonemic and phonic pieces daily. Yet the value is in the recording of authentic language. The daily routine of modeling a shared experience allows you to develop oral language, vocabulary, speaking and listening skills, sight words – and much, much more!

Practice handwriting daily. Make sure you engage with the R&W Monster as you write freely on a surface such as a whiteboard. Have your students chant the handwriting story as they write. End with saying the story again while incorporating the KMP for the particular letter.

Most importantly, have fun as you play with sounds!

Dr. Terry Kindervater, Ph.D.
Educator & Founder of Phonics in Motion

KMPs

Introduce

/b/

Review

/s/, /t /, /w/, /p/,

Expose

/au/
/i/

Poem

(To the tune of Frere Jacques)

It is August.
It is August.
School begins.
School begins.
Markers, crayons, and pencils.
Scissors and a glue stick.
Meet new friends!
Meet new friends!
-- Terry and Sally

Introduce

/a/

Review

/r /, /f/, /c/, /m/, /j/

Expose

/ch/

Poem

Run, run, run
As fast as you can.
You can’t catch me.
I’m the Gingerbread Man.
(Do the KMP for the /j/ for the soft g in Gingerbread. Do what you hear!)

Introduce

/i/

Review

/r/, /s/, /h/, /m/, /l/

Expose

/er/
/-ing/

Poem

(To the tune of Frere Jacques)

It’s September.
It’s September.
School is here.
School is here.
Reading, Writing, Math.
Social Studies, Science.
Recess, lunch!
Recess, lunch!
-- Terry and Sally

Introduce

/l/

Review

/w/, /s/, /b/, /m/

Expose

/ee/
/e/
/ch/

Poem

Look in the mirror.
What do I see?
A beautiful child.
Special, special me.

Introduce

/u/

Review

/p/, /w/

Expose

/ch/
/au/
/y/

Poem

Paw Paw Song

Picking up paw paws
Put ‘em in your pocket.
Picking up paw paws
Put ‘em in your pocket.
Picking up paw paws
Put ‘em in your pocket
Way down yonder in the paw paw patch.

Introduce

/g/, /ee/

Review

/t/, /l/, /a/, /h/, /m/, /c/, /d/

Expose

/o/
/sh/
short /oo/
-ing

Poem

"Two Little Apples"

Two little apples hanging on a tree,
Two little apples smiling at me.
I shook that tree as hard as I could.
Down came the apples,
Mm! Mm! Good!
(By: Anonymous)

Reading and Writing Monster: Handwriting Stories

Hh

h is a high chair.

Top to bottom.
Go halfway up.
Move away from the Monster,
High, high, high chair.
(If back of high chair is not tall, baby will fall out!)

Aa

a is an acrobat.
a goes to the Monster.
Oh, oh, oh I got away.
Draw a line down. Ta da!

Ii

i is itty bitty.

(Also compare i to l.
l is a long, long line.)

Ll

l is a long, long line.

Uu

u is ugh.
Go top to bottom and curve away.
And draw the line.

Gg

g is “Good, Gone, Goofy.”
Starts with a circle.
g goes away like a good guy.
(while stroking the line)
g hooks right back to the Monster.
Good, Gone, Goofy!

The Language Calendar

Daily

  • Illustrate each entry with a picture to match text.
  • Point to beginning of each word.
  • Model and discuss moving L to R, Top to Bottom.
  • Ask, “Where do I begin to read?”
  • Clap a short word (one syllable) and a long word (2 or more syllables).
  • Stretch out a word on the arm. Say it slowly.
  • Read favorite literature to write about on the Calendar.
  • Practice handwriting on whiteboards WHILE saying the story aloud. Write without lines!
  • Draw a box around a sight word.

Monthly

  • Before writing, count words on hand with class. Draw a line for EVERY word before writing entry.
  • Entries should be written in past tense unless it is a real-time event such as birthday for a student.
  • Count the words after you write
  • Focus on a handwriting story for one letter a week.
  • Use entries that correlate with ELA Standards (character, setting).
  • Include non-fiction entries. (Plants flourish in the summer.)
  • Include entries for Science, Social Studies (sink/float, characteristics of animals).
  • Revisit Poems and expand the number of KMPs used

Examples of Entries

Activities

Examples for CAP & ELA Focus

Example of Entries

We had a fire drill. We were very quiet!

Activities

  • Illustrate children outside at fire drill. Draw sh! in speech bubble in illustration. Journal about fire drill.

Examples for CAP & ELA Focus

  • Do KMPs for beginning and ending sounds
  • KMP :/q/
  • Sight word: we
  • Capital letter at beginning of sentence
  • How many sentences?  How many words in the first sentence?  How many words in the second sentence?
  • Period
  • Exclamation mark

Example of Entries

We came to our school. Hip, hip, hooray!

Activities

  • Draw a picture of school and write its name. Illustrate children giving a cheer outside.
  • Children illustrate a picture of themselves at school. (You can give them a picture of the school to glue in journal.)
  • Label with name or ‘me’.

Examples for CAP & ELA Focus

  • Do KMPs for beginning and ending sounds.
  • KMPs: /w/, /c/, /m/, /h/
  • Exclamation mark (Excitement mark)
  • Reading left to right, moving away from the R&W Monster
  • Picture-to-text match

Example of Entries

We wrote the letter 'a' MANY times on our whiteboards. a is an acrobat. a goes to the Monster, comes away and goes down.... Ta Da!(Note: Use the letter formation taught through your handwriting program, e.g. Zane-Blaser, D'Nealian)

Activities

  • Children draw the R& W Monster on the left of their whiteboards. After teacher models, children write a’s as they chant the story aloud. Teacher directs. “Let’s write a big one. Let’s write a little one.” Always say handwriting story aloud together. (NOTE: I draw a high wire as the line. When children write the final stroke downward and land on the line (wire), we say, “Ta Da!”)

Examples for CAP & ELA Focus

  • Do KMPs for beginning and ending sounds.
  • Punctuation: period, exclamation point
  • Return sweep on two or more lines of text
  • Sight words: we, the, to
  • Clap short words (one clap): we, goes, to, down
  • Clap long words (two or more claps): many, acrobat, Monster

Example of Entries

We made a gingerbread man.

Activities

  • Read The Gingerbread Man to your class.
  • When finished, each child decorates a paper gingerbread boy/girl.
  • Teacher makes a class gingerbread man and welcomes it to Room ____. Post in prominent place.
  • Draw Gingerbread Man in journal, Label.

Examples for CAP & ELA Focus

  • Do KMPs for beginning and ending sounds.
  • Count the number of words in the sentence.
  • Count the number of letter in gingerbread
  • Clap gingerbread: 3 claps

Example of Entries

Our Gingerbread Man escaped! He went to Art class.

Activities

  • Arrange for Gingerbread Man to be today’s special class (Art, Music, Library, etc). Engage the children with the idea that the Gingerbread Man really escaped in the building.
  • Draw a picture of the Gingerbread Man in that class and the teacher’s name (Art, Music, PE).
  • Use KMPs for initial sounds.
  • Begin “Our Gingerbread Man“ Book. Children glue picture of the Gingerbread Man in a special class. (Our Gingerbread Man went to Art.)
  • Label.
  • Make a “Wanted” poster Ior the Gingerbread Man. Label.
  • Continue this activity daily for the next week as the class meets their new teachers for specials.  Bring the Gingerbread Man back to your room each day.

Examples for CAP & ELA Focus

  • Do KMPs for beginning and ending sounds
  • KMP: /e/
  • Discuss how the R&W Monster pulls you back after the first line of text. (Return Sweep)
  • Sight word: went, our

Example of Entries

We read I Like Me by Nancy Carlson.

Activities

  • In journal, children draw and label 3 things they like about themselves.
  • Guide children to label with beginning sounds, prompting with KMPs.

Examples for CAP & ELA Focus

  • Underline the title of a book
  • Do KMPs for beginning and ending sounds.
  • Clap long words: Nancy, Carlson
  • Clap short words: we, read, I, like, me, by
  • Sight word: by
  • Capital letter
  • Period

Example of Entries

We made mirrors with paper plates and foil.

Activities

  • Above the calendar entry, draw a picture of a child holding a mirror.
  • Draw speech bubble with the word Me in it.
  • Make a mirror with a paper plate, foil and craft stick.
  • Write Me on the bottom.

Examples for CAP & ELA Focus

  • Do KMPs Ior beginning and ending sounds.
  • Count words in the sentence
  • Count letters in the word: we
  • Sight word: with

Example of Entries

We ate apples. Mm! Mm! Good!

Activities

  • Have an apple snack. Do KMP /m/ for Mm and /g/ for good. Then record entry.
  • Illustrate poem by putting 2 little apples in a tree. Guide children to label with ‘a’ for short /a/. Record, Mmmm!

Examples for CAP & ELA Focus

  • Do KMPs for beginning and ending sounds.
  • Excitement (Exclamation Point)
  • Sight word: good
  • Clap a long word: apples.  Clap a short word: ate

Example of Entries

We graphed our favorite apple.  Red apples won!

Activities

  • Make a class graph that has red, yellow, and green apples.
  • Give each child an apple to place on the graph beside their favorite apple.
  • Count and discuss: Which color is the most? Least? How many more red than yellow?

Examples for CAP & ELA Focus

  • KMP: /f/; /a/; /w/
  • How many sentences? Words? First word, last word?
  • Period at end
  • Exclamation mark
  • Sight words: we, our

THE VOWEL HOUSE

Introduction of the Vowel House

The Vowel House (VH) is a graphic organizer that supports children in their development of hearing vowel sounds and learning their corresponding spellings. Teachers direct children to listen for vowel sounds in words and to identify the corresponding VH window for that vowel sound, not its name. The routines used expose, practice and review vowel sounds continually.

The importance of these activities is that children are hearing and identifying the vowel sound. The vowel sounds in the words ‘made,’ ‘day,’ ‘rain’ and ‘eight’ result in the identification of the same VH window of long a. The name of the window is long a window (a-e) (as compared to the short a window (cat, hat). The introduction of the different spelling patterns comes when the children are sure of the sound and are ready for the written coding.

The use of the VH occurs in two distinct exercises: 1) listening for vowels in poetry and songs; and, 2) a weekly focus on particular vowel sounds appropriate for the grade level.

The first exercise is through poetry and is an overarching exposure to vowel sounds in natural language. A sequence of sounds is suggested with the poems we’ve provided.

If you choose your favorite poem instead of ours, great! Just make sure you’re exposing students to all of the sounds. You may want to focus on only one particular sound, or contrast two different vowel sounds. It’s up to you and the poem you’re developing.

By highlighting words within the poem, students listen and identify the vowel sound
and use its corresponding kinesthetic KMP. The phonemic awareness activity of hearing and identifying sounds is constantly embedded. In this exercise, they listen to the vowel sounds as opposed to reading the word and looking for the written vowel pattern. (Of course they read the words continually in the poem over the week.) In the end, it’s a light-hearted, playful listening exercise that is risk-free and supportive of all learners.

The second exercise involves focusing on a particular vowel sound or sounds for the week. A suggested sequence is presented, but your own series or the child’s needs might dictate a different order. Children focus on a particular VH window, its sound and its spelling over the course of the week. The critical part for your students is the identification of the vowel sound with the KMP and locating the VH window corresponding to the vowel of focus. The routine moves from whole class exposure to independent work with sorts and word hunts throughout the week.

Throughout the Week

  • Sing “Apples and Bananas” Daily
  • Choose various words from weekly poem
    • Identify vowel
    • Do KMP for vowel
    • Locate corresponding window
  • Choose 3-5 words daily from vowel focus of the week
    • Clap out word
    • Say and stretch word slowly from shoulder to fingertips
    • Segment into onset/rime
    • Segment into component sounds
    • Identify vowel
    • Locate corresponding window
    • Whole Group: Sort lists with 2
      different rimes (_at/_ap)
    • Independent Work: Individual sorts with particular vowel focus from Scope and Sequence. (See sample sheets Masters 2 and 3, VH Section in manual.)
    • Individual word hunts for the focused sound (Language Calendar, Reading, Poems, Journals).

Throughout the Month

  • Choose words from poems
    • Identify vowel
    • Do KMP for vowel
    • Locate corresponding window
  • Review and expose children to various vowels appropriate to need (one child might be listening for the /oi/ sound while another needs review of short /a/).
  • Remember to ask, “What do you hear?” and “Show me!” (asking for the KMP).
  • Model the integration of vowels into natural language
    • Point out sounds in poems
    • Highlight a similarity or difference in vowel sounds while writing on Language Calendar
    • Use KMPs continually (short /i/ and long /i/ in divide; short /a/ in add (Some children need to be guided to make connections across the curriculum.) Make it real!

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER

NOTES

WEEKLY VOWEL FOCUS

Begin with introducing each of the VH windows with the song, “Apples and Bananas.”

  • As you sing the song, you will change the /a/ sound in apples and ba/na/nas to the sounds represented by the window in the Vowel House (VH) (e.g. epples and benenes; ipples and bininis.)
  • Continue to change the vowel sounds in the song to the corresponding VH Window as you sing the song.

Review the sounds often by asking, “What’s the name of this window?”

PLAY! – Clap out short words from work
(The singing and games can be part of the Morning Meeting.)

  • Do this activity daily. It’s a great way to change vowel sounds and experience the impact of the vowel. And, it’s fun!
  • Make sure the children know the names and KMPs for the windows. Many will confuse the short and long markings, indicating that they’re not noticing the associated patterns, such as the final -e.
  • If you’re pointing to the long a (~a__e) window, you will sing, “I like to ate, ate, ate ay-ples and bay/nay/nays.”
  • If you are pointing to the short a window(~a__), then you’d sing, “I like to at, at at, apples and ba/na/nas (each vowel is the short /a/ sound).  This is important because the first and last syllable of ba/na/nas are short /u/ sounds. Make sure you do the KMP with each vowel sound.
  • When you sing, “I love to oit, oit, oit… oiples and boinoinois,” the children are tickled!
  • The answer is the sound accompanied by the use of the KMP.
  • (The Sound and the KMP combine to note the NAME of the window.)
  • Clap out short words from the word bank
  • Segment into component parts
  • Find correct VH window
  • Segment into onset/rime (c/at; r/an)
  • Whole group sorts focusing on changing rime (pp 20-21 in VH section)

VOWEL HOUSE SCOPE AND SEQUENCE

Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Short /ă/

WORD BANK:

act, ask, bat, bad, bag, cat, cap, cab, chat, dad, dab, fat,

fad, gap, gab, gal, gas, has, had, hat, jab, jam, lab, lad, lag, lap,

man, mad, mat, map, nap, pad, pal, rag, rat, chat

sad, sag, shag, sat, sap, tab, tad, tag, tap, vat, zap

Week 4

Week 5

Short /ŏ/

WORD BANK:

bop, chop, cot, cop, dot, got,

hot, jot, lob, lot, shot, slot, mob, mom, mop, nod, not, pod,

pot, rod, rot, shop, sod, Tom, flop, top, on

Week 6

Short /ă/ vs. Short /ŏ/

WORD BANK:

See weeks 1-5

Monthly Tip for Engaging Parents

Read the poem daily with your child as you point to each word. Make sure by the end of the week the child’s reading of the poem sounds like talking.

Count the lines of the poem.
Count the words in the first and last line.

Find the words that rhyme. Illustrate the poem and write a sentence together about it.

Have your child demonstrate the KMP (motion) for the sound at the beginning, middle and end of short words (is, child, shook, down). Find words that begin with h, short a, short i, l, ch, g, and short u. Show the KMPs (motion) for the sounds in fast and can.

Find the sight words (the, is, school, to, you, look) in the poems throughout the month.
Draw a box around them. These words don’t follow the rules if you try to sound them out.

KMP Videos